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Non-stop “hits” in “piracy” of pay TV programs

Non-stop “hits” in “piracy” of pay TV programs

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People sit at an outdoor restaurant and watch the UEFA Euro 2020 opening match between Turkey and Italy in Frankfurt, Germany, Friday, June 11, 2021. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
AP

A three-member Court of Criminal Appeal in eastern Crete handed down a prison sentence of more than two years, while a “civil war” broke out between pay-TV “pirates”.

Recently, “piracy” of subscription services in our country has received repeated blows, we remind you that it is a criminal act!

It caused a sensation a few days ago in Heraklion, Crete, by imposing a prison sentence of more than two years on a 60-year-old man by the three-member Court of Criminal Appeal in eastern Crete, finding the accused guilty of the crimes. Committing the crime of illegal broadcasting of audiovisual content at the professional and commercial level according to the relevant aggravating circumstances. This comes after a similar 3-year prison sentence in a similar criminal case in Larissa in the previous days.

At the same time, in the context of intense police activity to combat “piracy”, there is an increase in mutual accusations between criminal groups of illegal rebroadcast of subscription TV services. According to the information, these groups appear to have engaged in an intense cycle of mutual accusations, as their members testified before the authorities against their opponents.

Led by the Cybercrime Prosecution, as well as the Patras Security Sub-Directorate, which uncovered massive nationwide illegal subscription piracy rings generating huge profits, the authorities have taken measures to clarify these issues and reveal the truth behind the mutual accusations.

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Illegal organizations are vying for control of pay-TV packages, with a dispute recently erupting when one group attempted to invade the other's business by offering illegal pay-per-view packages to customers already on the rival group's roster. The show has escalated tensions between illegal organizations as they seek new sources of income and power.

These schemes and overlaps reflect the scale of the problem and widespread money laundering.

In the wake of stricter legislation and stiffer fines, illegal end users have been severely curtailed, leaving criminal hacker organizations vying to seize the remaining customers. These disputes and the oppositional dynamics of the groups caused tensions in the underworld and alarmed the authorities.

Consumers who, in order to save on fees for legitimate subscription services, resort to using pirated packages, end up bearing significant risks.